How Many Vietnam Veterans Are Left

How Many Vietnam Veterans Are Left?

Have you wondered how many Vietnam veterans are left? The Vietnam War from 1954 to 1975 was an extremely tumultuous time in American history and for that reason, it is unclear how many people actually served in this struggle. The number of people who were Vietnam veterans from the outset is a widely debated number. 

How Many Vietnam Veterans Are Left
Have You Wondered How Many Vietnam Veterans Are Left?

According to the American War Library website, the Department of Defense concluded that its best estimate is between 2,709,918 and 3,173,845 GIs served in Vietnam and nearby waters during the time period. from 1954 to 1975.

According to the American War Library website, the Department of Defense concluded that its best estimate is between 2,709,918 and 3,173,845 GIs served in Vietnam and nearby waters between 1954 and 1975. These numbers do not include Americans who served in Vietnam during World War II. 

However, other sources such as the New York Times asserted that the actual number of Vietnam veterans is around 9.2 million. This makes things a little confusing. So, if you want to know how many Vietnam veterans are left, keep on reading this article. 

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Vietnam Veterans By State 2021

Before going deeper into how many Vietnam veterans are left, you need to know some basic information about the Vietnam War. 

The Vietnam War was a conflict between the communist government of North Vietnam and its allies, the Viet Cong, in South Vietnam versus the government of the South Vietnamese government and the US, allied its main. The war lasted from 1954 to 1975 with the US entering the war in 1975.

How Many Vietnam Veterans Are Left
How Many Vietnam Veterans Are Left?

The US saw a threat to its national security with the spread of communism and was determined to end it. Protests against the escalating role of the US in the war began with demonstrations in 1964 and evolved into a nationwide social movement. Protesters argue that joining the war to prevent communist expansion is illegitimate or an intervention into a foreign civil war. 

In addition, widespread television coverage allowed people to see the violence and damage of the war, providing a moral basis for protesters to argue the war was too brutal to keep the US citizens here.

The United States completely withdrew from Vietnam on March 29, 1973, and the war officially ended on April 30, 1975. The Vietnam War was the longest war the United States had been involved in up to that point in history and the most controversial.

How many Vietnam Veterans Are Left?

As of February 28, 2019, an estimated 610,000 Americans who served in land forces during the Vietnam War or in air missions over Vietnam, according to a report by the American War Library from 1954 to 1975 are still alive today.

In addition, the report estimates that about 164,000 Americans who served at sea in Vietnamese waters during the same period are still alive today.

How Many Vietnam Veterans Are Left
Do You Know How Many Vietnam Veterans Are Left?

However, you need to know that these numbers don’t include the 2500 to 3000 US Air Force troops stationed in Guam, Thailand, and other countries that participated in the Vietnam War effort. These numbers weren’t included because these service members had no combat experience and did not spend any amount of time in harm’s way.

These numbers are due to extensive research on various mortality indicators and sources by the American War Library, which concluded that about a third of those who served in the Vietnam War are still alive today.

Interestingly, the research concluded that Vietnam veterans appear to be dying at the same rate as World War II veterans. However, the American War Library still continues to verify their accounts and draw more specific conclusions. 

How Many Vietnam Veterans Are Still Alive Today?

Another conclusion from The New York Times has different conclusions about the percentage of Vietnamese veterans still alive. They reported that the claims made by the American War Library were untrue and that instead of just a third of the remaining Vietnamese vets, this figure shows that more than 75% of Vietnam veterans are still alive and breathing to this day.

How Many Vietnam Veterans Are Left
Learn More How Many Vietnam Veterans Are Left

In the article, the writer quotes Patrick S. Brady in an article for The VVA Veteran, the reality is more reassuring. Rumors show the dangers of using incompatible numbers from different sources.

Apparently, it’s been agreed upon that 800,000 Vietnam veterans had passed away by the year 2000. This is a reasonable number but you get very different notions of the death rate when you compare 800,000 to 2.7 million versus 800,000 out of 9.2 million.

So, what is the difference in these numbers? It seems to be all about syntax.

It makes a big difference because saying that only one-third of Vietnam veterans are alive today is far crueler than saying that three-quarters of Vietnam veterans are still alive and well.

All in all, the truth is that until Vietnam veterans can agree on what constitutes a “real” Vietnamese veteran, the debate might continue.

In fact, the death rate for Vietnam veterans in recent years has been the same or lower than that of other men their age, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among men with an age distribution of Vietnam veterans alive in 2000, about 12% died in 2010, with about 1.5% of survivors predicted to die each year since.

Final Words

Thank you for taking the time to read our article: “How Many Vietnam Veterans Are Left”. Should you have a question or comment on this post, scroll down to the comments section below to leave your response. If you want to learn more about the Vietnam War and Veterans Day information, follow us on this blog.

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